Monday, 7 June 2010

You still haven't found what you're looking for

My friendly search engine/stalking machine/Big Brother let me know that some poor soul came upon my blog via a search for: 'what's needed to be a theology student?'

Now, I reckon my blog does little to answer that question, so I'm going to rectify this clear oversight:
  • You need to want to learn. Obvious, perhaps, but I have known students who stick to their guns so much that they fail to take onboard anything they are taught. If you're going to do this, save yourself a few thousand quid and stay at home.
  • Have a sense of humour. Seriously.
  • Know the Bible. People who wander into theological institutions (like myself) with a pretty hazy knowledge of the Bible are just asking for trouble. You will get battered and bruised.
  • No, really, have a sense of humour.
  • Be aware that a good theological institution will teach you how to think, not what to think. You're not studying theology to become a carbon copy of your lecturers (however good they may be), you're studying theology to engage with God of Scripture.
  • No, I'm not joking: have a sense of humour.
  • Listen to your lecturers. You may not like them, their style, or what they teach you. But listen, nonetheless. I regret the times I drifted off (purposefully or accidently) and missed absolute gems.
  • Er... yeah, sense of humour.
  • Finally, and most importantly (I think), be willing to make your theology work in the real world. There is no point studying theology and being tight-fisted, ungracious, and proud.
I think that's just about all I have to say on the matter, in blog-form anyway. Anyone who wants to pitch in, feel free. As MxPx once said, 'We're all just learning as we go...'

3 comments:

Elizabeth said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Swandive said...

Nicely put, Mr M.

philgroom said...

Books and chocolate. You can't study theology without books and chocolate. So you need to budget for these. Not for anything else: you don't need to budget for clothes, for instance: clothes are irrelevant and unnecessary: you can dress in old newspapers or chocolate wrappers if you budget for lots of chocolate. Or even the dust jackets from the books if you buy hardbacks.